By Room

What’s the Best Window Treatment for the Bathroom?

We all want our bathrooms to look their best. The problem: heat, humidity, and moisture.


It’s often the last room we visit before we go to bed and the first room we visit when we wake up. It’s the room where the average American spends 30 minutes per day. It is one of the most used and most underappreciated rooms in the home. We’re talking about the bathroom! For many, the bathroom serves more than a utilitarian purpose. It is a relaxation center – a place to unwind after a long day. So, it is important that the room looks the part.

"Don’t put bathroom window treatments at the bottom of your wish list, as they can add a much-need decorative blast to a functional space"
— Georgie Rudge, Townhouse Interiors

Durability

We all want our bathrooms to look their best. The problem: heat, humidity, and moisture. These three variables make it difficult to decorate, especially when it comes to selecting the perfect window treatments.

“Bathrooms are often the most humid rooms in your home due to the constant moisture from showers and bathtubs, so window treatments must be easy to clean and able to withstand high humidity without warping or staining,” according to the SFGate article “How to Decide on Window Treatments for Bathrooms.”

For moisture durability, focus on blinds and shades made of durable fabrics or vinyl.

Natural Light

Natural light is important. According to Dr. Victoria Revell, a chronobiologist at the University of Surrey, “Ensuring that we receive adequate light levels at the appropriate time of day benefits our alertness, mood, productivity, sleep patterns, and many aspects of our physiology.” However, balancing natural light and privacy can be a difficult task.

“Unlike other rooms, bathroom window treatments need to let in natural light while keeping prying eyes out,” says David Rasmussen of Rasmussen Construction in San Francisco.

Privacy

“Bathroom window treatments are more than just a dressing for a window frame,” writes HGTV blogger Sharon Merritt. “They need to pull double duty by beautifying a space and providing privacy.”

Try installing “window shades with a top-down option to let light in without sacrificing privacy,” advises Rasmussen. These window treatments allow more privacy by giving users a choice of opening window shades from the bottom up (the traditional method), or from the top down. The latter permits light to enter without giving up any privacy.